For information on 
the Dyslexia Retreat at the Entrance: 

A photo of one of my adult clients after his Dyslexia Retreat - finding balance in his life and learning how to read!

'The Right Brain for the Right Time' is Barbara's newest book on how to identify and manage dyslexia.

click here to get the book

click here to get the e-book

Dyslexia for Adults

If you are an adult and not sure if dyslexia is the cause of your problems, here are some indicators. Of course nobody has all of these traits and a lot of others won’t be named. Some of the characteristics you will find in yourself, though may be:

At work, do you?

  • Work at a job that will hide your literacy difficulties or where you aren’t required to read and write much?
  • Work in a higher position that requires a secretary to write?
  • Hide your literacy level from your colleagues?
  • Become frustrated attending “boring meetings” and slower or orderly tasks—often feeling that you already have the answer and others are painstakingly slow?
  • Get easily frustrated or anxious in new situations?
  • Feel overwhelmed by new or unexpected tasks?
  • Choose or prefer a visual, tactile or kinaesthetic career like: Designer, Architect, Engineer, Tradesman, Mechanic, Actor, Artist, Musician, Athlete, Sportsman, Builder or a Businessman with staff?
  • Display a lack of concentration of difficulty to focus on one task, preferring to multitask?
  • Pass on promotion to avoid having to write reports?
  • Avoid tests, having difficulty passing standardised tests, sometimes blocking achievements or self-sabotaging?
  • Consider yourself highly successful and driven—or an underachiever, not living up to your own potential?
  • Come up with creative new ideas that are out-of-the-box?
  • Try to avoid reading manuals, rather learning by doing, hands-on or demonstration?
  • Watch a YouTube clip on how-to-do anything?
  • See yourself as practical, street smart and a good judge of character?
  • Make choices intuitively or instinctively?
  • Display a sixth sense, or “read” people?
  • Remember having struggled at school, with reading, writing, spelling and/or math?
  • Rely on others to assist you, having become a skilful delegator?
  • Make frequent spelling mistakes?

    At home, do you?

  • Have poor recall of conversations or sequence of events, often arguing about occurrences?
  • Have a dyslexic child or children and sometimes see yourself in their struggle?
  • Feel insecure or avoid reading to your own children or helping them with their homework?
  • Get easily distracted, stressed, frustrated or overwhelmed?
  • Appear to “zone out” and retreat into your own world?
  • Play computer games or video games?
  • Get told you mispronounce words, without realising it?
  • Excel at sport?
  • Have excellent memory of some events and hardly remember stories from your school days?
  • Remember people’s faces but not their names?
  • Get accused of not listening?
  • Find it hard to remember verbal instructions, especially lengthy ones?
  • Avoid reading out loud?
  • Read silently or speed-read?
  • Find it easy to come up with jokes and situational humour?
  • Find that comprehension depend on the subject matter?
  • Frequently have to re-read sentences in order to comprehend?
  • Quickly become tired or bored with reading?
  • Rely on your partner for literacy skills?
  • Like writing capital letters only or use poor handwriting to mask poor spelling?
  • Guess at the use of punctuation marks?
  • Find hard math concepts easier than simple math concepts?
  • Have right-left confusion?
  • Lose track of time and are either always late or obsessively punctual, finding it hard to estimate how much time passed?
  • Lack self-esteem in certain areas of your life?
  • Function poorly in stressful situations?
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Testimonial from the Adult Program

My testimony:


To rehash a cliché, life is a journey. This journey provides many twists and turns and at times it throws you a curveball that lands you flat on your back.

My curveball was being told at age 37 that I had dyslexia. This was after years of teachers saying I was lazy and that I had the ability but lacked the work ethic to gain the rewards. Having very supportive family meant that I didn’t give up, but worked harder. No matter, however, how hard or long I worked, it never showed a reward in terms of marks. This frustration led to me just working longer and harder – call it my “pig-headed” nature.

My hard work and dedication to keep trying meant that socially I missed so much of my teenage years. My “best” work would manage to consistently get me between 70-75% in exams despite huge hours spent studying. This was my HSC mark, this was my average in my Honours degree in Psychology, my Honours degree in Medical Science and my Medical degree. Yes I am a doctor with dyslexia, but this is not the end of my dream I wish to specialise and this is where the 75% ceiling mark has not allowed me to go further. Failing specialist exams led me to be tested for why I was failing despite long hours of study, the answer was dyslexia.

With the diagnosis I thought I had the answer to all my problems up to this point, but all it meant was that I floundered because I didn’t know what to do next. This led my journey to cross paths with Barbara Hoi and the Davis method.

The fact was that Barbara taught me that Dyslexia was not a disadvantage but in fact a huge advantage, this turned my thinking around. Barbara was able to show me where my brain was working and why I thought the way I did. Barbara also taught me what the “rest of the world” wanted and how they see the world. Barbara has given me the confidence to pick up the pieces and try again, despite how high the mountain in front me is. The fact is that there will always be mountains in our journey, it’s how we approach these mountains which shows our worth.

I am lucky to have had a supportive upbringing and even more fortunate to have a wonderful, caring and understanding wife. Those who support us with dyslexia become so frustrated not at us but for us.

It doesn’t matter where you are in your life journey, young or old, the fact is that you need to surround yourself with people who support and encourage you. I feel that Barbara has helped me so much to this point and I know she will as I move through my journey.

If you feel that you are frustrated, misunderstood or even angry with your diagnosis, Barbara will help you see that dyslexia is not a burden but an advantage. Barbara will teach how to use this and flourish IF you believe and trust her.

My story is to be continued but I know that whatever happens at this point so many questions have been answered and frustrations allayed thanks to Barbara.

Thank you

Dr Neil Macpherson

B. Med., B.Med.Sci (Hons), B.A. (Psych)(hons)